The Starlink Satellite Train: Mistaken for UFOs, Bringing Low-Cost Internet to Remote Locations

The Starlink Satellite Train: Mistaken for UFOs, Bringing Low-Cost Internet to Remote Locations

The Starlink Satellite Train: Mistaken for UFOs, Bringing Low-Cost Internet to Remote Locations

If you happen to look up at the sky in Houston tonight and Friday night, you might spot the Starlink “satellite train.” This train refers to a network of satellites developed by SpaceX with the goal of providing low-cost internet access to remote areas. Currently, there are more than 4,500 Starlink satellites in orbit, located approximately 340 miles above Earth.

These satellites often create a spectacle in the night sky, resembling a parade of lights. Although they are commonly mistaken for unidentified flying objects (UFOs), they are indeed part of SpaceX’s Starlink project.

For those in Houston, the Starlink train will be particularly bright over the next two nights. On Thursday, it will be visible from northwest to east at around 8:30 p.m. On Friday, it can be seen from northwest to south at approximately 8:38 p.m.

If you prefer a more subdued viewing experience, there are also opportunities to catch a glimpse of the Starlink satellites in the early mornings. On Friday, at 5:21 a.m., they will be visible from north to northeast. On Saturday at 6:09 a.m., they will be visible from west to northeast. Sunday offers two viewing windows: at 5:26 a.m. from north to northeast and again at 6:05 a.m. from northwest to southeast. Finally, on Monday at 5:53 a.m., they will be visible from west to southeast.

During these viewing windows, the satellites can be seen for several minutes, ranging from two to seven minutes.

In August, many people witnessed the Starlink satellite train after 15 additional satellites were launched from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. Videos of the string of lights flooded social media, leaving viewers intrigued by the phenomenon.

Overall, the Starlink satellite train is not a visitation from another world, but rather a technological advance in the pursuit of providing internet accessibility to even the most remote corners of the globe.

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