How AI-generated job applications are changing the recruitment process

How AI-generated job applications are changing the recruitment process

How AI-generated job applications are changing the recruitment process

In recent years, the rise of artificial intelligence has transformed the way we live, work and communicate. One area where AI has made a significant impact is in the recruitment process, where the use of AI-generated job applications is changing the way we evaluate job candidates.

One of the most notable AI chatbots that is enabling anyone with internet access to generate anything in the written form is ChatGPT. Since its launch in November 2022, ChatGPT has been used by job seekers to produce convincing cover letters, bullet-pointed CVs, and even pre-interview presentations. Using a dataset containing 570 billion individual words, this AI chatbot can complete complex, written tasks in moments, making it an invaluable creative tool for producing efficient content.

But while the use of generative AI is empowering job seekers to produce high-quality job applications, it’s also changing the way recruiters evaluate candidates. Hiring managers are becoming increasingly aware that candidates may be using AI to assist them with their job applications, and as the technology grows in sophistication, it could create a shift in job applications as we know them, moving recruiters away from the traditional modes of evaluating candidates.

Adam Nicoll, group marketing director at recruitment and job-consulting firm Randstad, based in Luton, UK, believes that the use of generative AI to produce cover letters is not cheating the hiring process, but rather a digitized version of asking a friend to review a CV. He also notes that the cover letter has been on its way out for years and that hiring managers are already relying less on traditional modes of evaluating candidates. As a result, some hiring managers may turn to social media and LinkedIn profiles to understand a candidate’s personality.

However, not all recruiters see the use of generative AI as a positive development. Some believe that the AI-generated content may lack the personal touch and creativity that hiring managers look for in job applications. This has led some recruiters to introduce harder assessments in response, such as assessments demanding more creative and abstract thought from the candidate. Brooke Weddle, partner at consulting firm McKinsey & Company, based in Washington, DC, suggests that employers may put greater emphasis on scrutinizing candidates in face-to-face settings, focusing on cultural fit and soft skills during the interview process.

Furthermore, some recruiters are already embracing new AI tools on their side of the job hiring process. For instance, some large corporations are leveraging AI in the recruitment process to test job seekers’ qualities through skill- and personality assessments, which use data-driven behavioural insights to match candidates against vacancies and reveal their soft skills. These kinds of emerging platforms that give recruiters more data on candidates stand to change the job-application process, too, especially as “we move from degree certifications to skills-based hiring,” says Weddle.

Overall, the use of AI-generated job applications is changing the recruitment process in significant ways. As the technology continues to evolve, we can expect further changes in how job seekers apply for jobs and how recruiters evaluate candidates. The importance of skills-based hiring is likely to increase, and recruiters may rely less on traditional modes of evaluating candidates in favor of more data-driven approaches. Nevertheless, it’s clear that the use of AI in the recruitment process is here to stay, and those who embrace it are likely to reap the rewards.